American Crow
Corvus brachyrhynchos

f6.7 @ 1/1600s, ISO:640, Nikon D3S w 500mm and 1.7X teleconverter


"American Crow," Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The American crow is a large passerine bird species of the family Corvidae. It is a common bird found throughout much of North America. American crows are the new world counterpart to the carrion crow and the hooded crow. Although the American crow and the hooded crow are very similar in size, structure and behavior, their calls are different. The American crow nevertheless occupies the same role the hooded crow does in Eurasia. The American crow is a large, distinctive bird with iridescent black feathers all over. Its legs, feet and bill are also black. They measure 4053 cm (1621 in) in length, of which the tail makes up about 40%. The wing chord is 24.5 to 33 cm (9.6 to 13.0 in), with the wingspan ranging from 85 to 100 cm (33 to 39 in). The bill length can be from 3 to 5.5 cm (1.2 to 2.2 in), varying strongly according to location. The tarsus is 5.5 to 6.5 cm (2.2 to 2.6 in) and the tail is 13.5 to 19 cm (5.3 to 7.5 in). The body mass can vary from 316 to 620 g (11.1 to 21.9 oz). Males tend to be larger than females.
East Falmouth, Massachusetts
 
01/26/2018