Bald Eagle
Haliaeetus leucocephalus

f4 @ 1/8000s, ISO:800, Nikon D300S w 300mm


"Bald Eagle," Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The bald eagle is a powerful flier, and soars on thermal convection currents. It reaches speeds of 5670 km/h (3543 mph) when gliding and flapping, and about 48 km/h (30 mph) while carrying fish. Its dive speed is between 120160 km/h (7599 mph), though it seldom dives vertically. It is partially migratory, depending on location. If its territory has access to open water, it remains there year-round, but if the body of water freezes during the winter, making it impossible to obtain food, it migrates to the south or to the coast. A number of populations are subject to post-breeding dispersal, mainly in juveniles; Florida eagles, for example, will disperse northwards in the summer. The bald eagle selects migration routes which take advantage of thermals, updrafts, and food resources. During migration, it may ascend in a thermal and then glide down, or may ascend in updrafts created by the wind against a cliff or other terrain. Migration generally takes place during the daytime, usually between the local hours of 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m., when thermals are produced by the sun.
Homer, Alaska
 
03/14/2015